Archive for the ‘film’ Category

Black, White, whatever…

Monday, October 6th, 2008

Excellent video!

By: Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai

Yes, we can. We will. Si, se puede!

Sunday, February 3rd, 2008

The Upward Spiral – Life

Thursday, January 31st, 2008

A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


I composed a short list of some essential readings that reflect a world-view appropriate to the Internet Era, site I shared it with friends studying Community Informatics and Civic Entrepreurship, erectile two domains seeking a better world. Since I recently catalogued (part of) my personal library using health open standard” target=”_blank”>LibraryThing, it makes sense to share these here as well (as they are part of my virtual library).

These writings provide a conceptual matrix for an interesting breed of Civic Entrepreneur- (it’s a partial list) … really a new model of Citizenship and Society/Polity. They aren’t new to a lot of you – and if you have other works that you think really need to be on the list, please let me know.

Movement as Network, by Gideon Rosenblatt, also: The three pillars of social source

David Isenberg’s Rise of the Stupid Network

Pushing Power to the Edges (pdf) by Jillaine Smith, Martin Kearns, Allison Fine

The Cluetrain Manifesto (Doc Searles, et al.)

Cory Doctorow’s Down & Out in the Magic Kingdom

Coase’s Penguin: (by Yochai Benkler … his book The Wealth of Networks is also recommended. There’s a wiki inviting discussion of his ideas.)

The list doesn’t represent any hierarchic ordering.
A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


I composed a short list of some essential readings that reflect a world-view appropriate to the Internet Era, site I shared it with friends studying Community Informatics and Civic Entrepreurship, erectile two domains seeking a better world. Since I recently catalogued (part of) my personal library using health open standard” target=”_blank”>LibraryThing, it makes sense to share these here as well (as they are part of my virtual library).

These writings provide a conceptual matrix for an interesting breed of Civic Entrepreneur- (it’s a partial list) … really a new model of Citizenship and Society/Polity. They aren’t new to a lot of you – and if you have other works that you think really need to be on the list, please let me know.

Movement as Network, by Gideon Rosenblatt, also: The three pillars of social source

David Isenberg’s Rise of the Stupid Network

Pushing Power to the Edges (pdf) by Jillaine Smith, Martin Kearns, Allison Fine

The Cluetrain Manifesto (Doc Searles, et al.)

Cory Doctorow’s Down & Out in the Magic Kingdom

Coase’s Penguin: (by Yochai Benkler … his book The Wealth of Networks is also recommended. There’s a wiki inviting discussion of his ideas.)

The list doesn’t represent any hierarchic ordering.
A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


I composed a short list of some essential readings that reflect a world-view appropriate to the Internet Era, site I shared it with friends studying Community Informatics and Civic Entrepreurship, erectile two domains seeking a better world. Since I recently catalogued (part of) my personal library using health open standard” target=”_blank”>LibraryThing, it makes sense to share these here as well (as they are part of my virtual library).

These writings provide a conceptual matrix for an interesting breed of Civic Entrepreneur- (it’s a partial list) … really a new model of Citizenship and Society/Polity. They aren’t new to a lot of you – and if you have other works that you think really need to be on the list, please let me know.

Movement as Network, by Gideon Rosenblatt, also: The three pillars of social source

David Isenberg’s Rise of the Stupid Network

Pushing Power to the Edges (pdf) by Jillaine Smith, Martin Kearns, Allison Fine

The Cluetrain Manifesto (Doc Searles, et al.)

Cory Doctorow’s Down & Out in the Magic Kingdom

Coase’s Penguin: (by Yochai Benkler … his book The Wealth of Networks is also recommended. There’s a wiki inviting discussion of his ideas.)

The list doesn’t represent any hierarchic ordering.
We’re facing big problems, this and we are less able to dismiss them from consciousness. We recognize the complexities of governance and so aren’t surprised as issues blend into each other and over national, decease jurisdictional, discount institutional and conceptual boundaries… It can be overwhelming.

We need new narratives of governance, cooperation, freedom and accountability in order to meet challenge to the species. The Great Turning offers a narrative that more accurately frames our situation and allows us to collectively align our response grounded in the heritage of human dignity.

David Korten has written extensively on this.   Here’s a related piece by Joanna Macy (pointed out on Weblogsky).
A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


I composed a short list of some essential readings that reflect a world-view appropriate to the Internet Era, site I shared it with friends studying Community Informatics and Civic Entrepreurship, erectile two domains seeking a better world. Since I recently catalogued (part of) my personal library using health open standard” target=”_blank”>LibraryThing, it makes sense to share these here as well (as they are part of my virtual library).

These writings provide a conceptual matrix for an interesting breed of Civic Entrepreneur- (it’s a partial list) … really a new model of Citizenship and Society/Polity. They aren’t new to a lot of you – and if you have other works that you think really need to be on the list, please let me know.

Movement as Network, by Gideon Rosenblatt, also: The three pillars of social source

David Isenberg’s Rise of the Stupid Network

Pushing Power to the Edges (pdf) by Jillaine Smith, Martin Kearns, Allison Fine

The Cluetrain Manifesto (Doc Searles, et al.)

Cory Doctorow’s Down & Out in the Magic Kingdom

Coase’s Penguin: (by Yochai Benkler … his book The Wealth of Networks is also recommended. There’s a wiki inviting discussion of his ideas.)

The list doesn’t represent any hierarchic ordering.
A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


I composed a short list of some essential readings that reflect a world-view appropriate to the Internet Era, site I shared it with friends studying Community Informatics and Civic Entrepreurship, erectile two domains seeking a better world. Since I recently catalogued (part of) my personal library using health open standard” target=”_blank”>LibraryThing, it makes sense to share these here as well (as they are part of my virtual library).

These writings provide a conceptual matrix for an interesting breed of Civic Entrepreneur- (it’s a partial list) … really a new model of Citizenship and Society/Polity. They aren’t new to a lot of you – and if you have other works that you think really need to be on the list, please let me know.

Movement as Network, by Gideon Rosenblatt, also: The three pillars of social source

David Isenberg’s Rise of the Stupid Network

Pushing Power to the Edges (pdf) by Jillaine Smith, Martin Kearns, Allison Fine

The Cluetrain Manifesto (Doc Searles, et al.)

Cory Doctorow’s Down & Out in the Magic Kingdom

Coase’s Penguin: (by Yochai Benkler … his book The Wealth of Networks is also recommended. There’s a wiki inviting discussion of his ideas.)

The list doesn’t represent any hierarchic ordering.
We’re facing big problems, this and we are less able to dismiss them from consciousness. We recognize the complexities of governance and so aren’t surprised as issues blend into each other and over national, decease jurisdictional, discount institutional and conceptual boundaries… It can be overwhelming.

We need new narratives of governance, cooperation, freedom and accountability in order to meet challenge to the species. The Great Turning offers a narrative that more accurately frames our situation and allows us to collectively align our response grounded in the heritage of human dignity.

David Korten has written extensively on this.   Here’s a related piece by Joanna Macy (pointed out on Weblogsky).
A cool site/tool I was recently made aware of… LibraryThing.

I like that it uses an open standard for managing my book collection: Z39.50.

I also like that I can export my data.

You can see a more extensive listing of my library here.


I composed a short list of some essential readings that reflect a world-view appropriate to the Internet Era, site I shared it with friends studying Community Informatics and Civic Entrepreurship, erectile two domains seeking a better world. Since I recently catalogued (part of) my personal library using health open standard” target=”_blank”>LibraryThing, it makes sense to share these here as well (as they are part of my virtual library).

These writings provide a conceptual matrix for an interesting breed of Civic Entrepreneur- (it’s a partial list) … really a new model of Citizenship and Society/Polity. They aren’t new to a lot of you – and if you have other works that you think really need to be on the list, please let me know.

Movement as Network, by Gideon Rosenblatt, also: The three pillars of social source

David Isenberg’s Rise of the Stupid Network

Pushing Power to the Edges (pdf) by Jillaine Smith, Martin Kearns, Allison Fine

The Cluetrain Manifesto (Doc Searles, et al.)

Cory Doctorow’s Down & Out in the Magic Kingdom

Coase’s Penguin: (by Yochai Benkler … his book The Wealth of Networks is also recommended. There’s a wiki inviting discussion of his ideas.)

The list doesn’t represent any hierarchic ordering.
We’re facing big problems, this and we are less able to dismiss them from consciousness. We recognize the complexities of governance and so aren’t surprised as issues blend into each other and over national, decease jurisdictional, discount institutional and conceptual boundaries… It can be overwhelming.

We need new narratives of governance, cooperation, freedom and accountability in order to meet challenge to the species. The Great Turning offers a narrative that more accurately frames our situation and allows us to collectively align our response grounded in the heritage of human dignity.

David Korten has written extensively on this.   Here’s a related piece by Joanna Macy (pointed out on Weblogsky).

I’ve meant to come back to this for some time. Adventitiously, tadalafil the Upward Spiral has been coming up a lot lately. This piece is a kind of parable on Life and Ecology.

The Prisoner: Politics as Free for All

Friday, January 11th, 2008

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

There’s a confessional book out on the New Hampshire “phone jamming” effort to impact the elections back in 2002. The author was interviewed on Democracy Now (Tuesday, generic Jan 8 2008). His work in New Hampshire and New Jersey under the direction of leadership is a emblematic of the most impoverished war mentality: winning at all costs.

Witness the two examples offered: first, the “phone jamming” … the overloading of the phone system at the NH democratic campaign offices embodies a straight-forward tactic in warfare, it amounts to taking out communications of your opponent. (Do you hear an echo of Sun Tzu?)

A second example, fits the category of psychological operations … creating pre-recorded messages simulating an automated phone message campaign of the democrats, republican operatives played upon racial fears and labor force insecurity by using minority voices/accents in NJ. Ugly rumors, manipulation of media messages, cultural stereotypes in the general school of low-rhetoric has become accepted. Impersonation of the opponent’s communications, and selective targeting of their likely supporters with divisive messages is significantly more calculated and abhorent.

(Other infamous moments in electoral history reek of the war mentality and speak poorly of our national politics: watergate – irangate.)

Party leadership (of any party) should not conduct itself in a manner beneath the dignity of our republic. Playing hard and playing to win – i.e. with determination – are not the same as winning at any costs. (We can debate this, but I think that even in war, we should not seek to “win at any cost”.) If in our politics we aim for a simple majority of the votes that are counted… partisan electioneers will tend to lose interest in a whole and healthy polity in the scramble for what amounts to a cheapened “victory”.

There’s a lot of room for criticism of our political system… winner take all appears much less attractive than proportional representation (beyond the two-party system), alternative run-off and consensus building paradigms.

Winning at all costs has a deleterious effect… it debases all involved. (But, as debasing as phone jamming and domestic psy-ops may be – challenging voter eligibility and undermining the integrity of the ballot system seem more nefarious. The former being a mean spirited and perhaps racially charged invoking of the letter of the law, the latter demoralizing those who might otherwise argue that our system works despite it’s flaws.)

I’m once again brought back to Kant’s maxim: never fight (a war) in such a manner that would preclude a future peace. I try to apply this at many layers of my life… personal relationships, issue advocacy, political rhetoric. It places one in a very different mind than the war profiteers and war mongers who are vested in perpetual domination and conflict.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

There’s a confessional book out on the New Hampshire “phone jamming” effort to impact the elections back in 2002. The author was interviewed on Democracy Now (Tuesday, generic Jan 8 2008). His work in New Hampshire and New Jersey under the direction of leadership is a emblematic of the most impoverished war mentality: winning at all costs.

Witness the two examples offered: first, the “phone jamming” … the overloading of the phone system at the NH democratic campaign offices embodies a straight-forward tactic in warfare, it amounts to taking out communications of your opponent. (Do you hear an echo of Sun Tzu?)

A second example, fits the category of psychological operations … creating pre-recorded messages simulating an automated phone message campaign of the democrats, republican operatives played upon racial fears and labor force insecurity by using minority voices/accents in NJ. Ugly rumors, manipulation of media messages, cultural stereotypes in the general school of low-rhetoric has become accepted. Impersonation of the opponent’s communications, and selective targeting of their likely supporters with divisive messages is significantly more calculated and abhorent.

(Other infamous moments in electoral history reek of the war mentality and speak poorly of our national politics: watergate – irangate.)

Party leadership (of any party) should not conduct itself in a manner beneath the dignity of our republic. Playing hard and playing to win – i.e. with determination – are not the same as winning at any costs. (We can debate this, but I think that even in war, we should not seek to “win at any cost”.) If in our politics we aim for a simple majority of the votes that are counted… partisan electioneers will tend to lose interest in a whole and healthy polity in the scramble for what amounts to a cheapened “victory”.

There’s a lot of room for criticism of our political system… winner take all appears much less attractive than proportional representation (beyond the two-party system), alternative run-off and consensus building paradigms.

Winning at all costs has a deleterious effect… it debases all involved. (But, as debasing as phone jamming and domestic psy-ops may be – challenging voter eligibility and undermining the integrity of the ballot system seem more nefarious. The former being a mean spirited and perhaps racially charged invoking of the letter of the law, the latter demoralizing those who might otherwise argue that our system works despite it’s flaws.)

I’m once again brought back to Kant’s maxim: never fight (a war) in such a manner that would preclude a future peace. I try to apply this at many layers of my life… personal relationships, issue advocacy, political rhetoric. It places one in a very different mind than the war profiteers and war mongers who are vested in perpetual domination and conflict.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

There’s a confessional book out on the New Hampshire “phone jamming” effort to impact the elections back in 2002. The author was interviewed on Democracy Now (Tuesday, generic Jan 8 2008). His work in New Hampshire and New Jersey under the direction of leadership is a emblematic of the most impoverished war mentality: winning at all costs.

Witness the two examples offered: first, the “phone jamming” … the overloading of the phone system at the NH democratic campaign offices embodies a straight-forward tactic in warfare, it amounts to taking out communications of your opponent. (Do you hear an echo of Sun Tzu?)

A second example, fits the category of psychological operations … creating pre-recorded messages simulating an automated phone message campaign of the democrats, republican operatives played upon racial fears and labor force insecurity by using minority voices/accents in NJ. Ugly rumors, manipulation of media messages, cultural stereotypes in the general school of low-rhetoric has become accepted. Impersonation of the opponent’s communications, and selective targeting of their likely supporters with divisive messages is significantly more calculated and abhorent.

(Other infamous moments in electoral history reek of the war mentality and speak poorly of our national politics: watergate – irangate.)

Party leadership (of any party) should not conduct itself in a manner beneath the dignity of our republic. Playing hard and playing to win – i.e. with determination – are not the same as winning at any costs. (We can debate this, but I think that even in war, we should not seek to “win at any cost”.) If in our politics we aim for a simple majority of the votes that are counted… partisan electioneers will tend to lose interest in a whole and healthy polity in the scramble for what amounts to a cheapened “victory”.

There’s a lot of room for criticism of our political system… winner take all appears much less attractive than proportional representation (beyond the two-party system), alternative run-off and consensus building paradigms.

Winning at all costs has a deleterious effect… it debases all involved. (But, as debasing as phone jamming and domestic psy-ops may be – challenging voter eligibility and undermining the integrity of the ballot system seem more nefarious. The former being a mean spirited and perhaps racially charged invoking of the letter of the law, the latter demoralizing those who might otherwise argue that our system works despite it’s flaws.)

I’m once again brought back to Kant’s maxim: never fight (a war) in such a manner that would preclude a future peace. I try to apply this at many layers of my life… personal relationships, issue advocacy, political rhetoric. It places one in a very different mind than the war profiteers and war mongers who are vested in perpetual domination and conflict.

I’m taking a course on storytelling. Although I have been involved in community informatics for several years as an activist and organizer on digital divide/digital excellence and community networking, resuscitator I found this work to involve the telling of stories and general reframing community and what we are about, more about or what is possible for us.

I was watching a video from the TED conference where Isabel Allende offered the old adage: What is truer than truth? The story. (Variants on this answer may be a matter of translation: Legend, Myth, Story, Narrative.)

I grew up on Grimm, and many mythologies… great preparation for an early encounter with Joseph Campbell via the Power of Myth (where Bill Moyers, another hero, interviewed him). I later made extensive study of semiotics and have an enduring interest in narrative, and the importance of story and discourse.

In recent years Italo Calvino brought me back to the play of stories/storytelling in the work of the OuLiPo — where art is craft that you work at each day, and good art or literature arises from finding the right combination of signs through experiment and experienced judgment.

Campbell’s work on myth and ritual, the idea of the story opening a path to greater truth than mere facts, or perhaps a greater truth in discourse around a story than in any particular telling or offering of an account, and the idea in Calvino that folktale is not myth degenerated but that myth arises out of folktale when the right combination his hit upon, these are all connected.

Storytelling is part of the natural and necessary repertoire of human behavior… it helps us cope and adapt as well as honor and remember. Though stories can be used to divide, their healing potential is critical in this moment. Our creative play can reconfigure our individuality and our collective life.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

There’s a confessional book out on the New Hampshire “phone jamming” effort to impact the elections back in 2002. The author was interviewed on Democracy Now (Tuesday, generic Jan 8 2008). His work in New Hampshire and New Jersey under the direction of leadership is a emblematic of the most impoverished war mentality: winning at all costs.

Witness the two examples offered: first, the “phone jamming” … the overloading of the phone system at the NH democratic campaign offices embodies a straight-forward tactic in warfare, it amounts to taking out communications of your opponent. (Do you hear an echo of Sun Tzu?)

A second example, fits the category of psychological operations … creating pre-recorded messages simulating an automated phone message campaign of the democrats, republican operatives played upon racial fears and labor force insecurity by using minority voices/accents in NJ. Ugly rumors, manipulation of media messages, cultural stereotypes in the general school of low-rhetoric has become accepted. Impersonation of the opponent’s communications, and selective targeting of their likely supporters with divisive messages is significantly more calculated and abhorent.

(Other infamous moments in electoral history reek of the war mentality and speak poorly of our national politics: watergate – irangate.)

Party leadership (of any party) should not conduct itself in a manner beneath the dignity of our republic. Playing hard and playing to win – i.e. with determination – are not the same as winning at any costs. (We can debate this, but I think that even in war, we should not seek to “win at any cost”.) If in our politics we aim for a simple majority of the votes that are counted… partisan electioneers will tend to lose interest in a whole and healthy polity in the scramble for what amounts to a cheapened “victory”.

There’s a lot of room for criticism of our political system… winner take all appears much less attractive than proportional representation (beyond the two-party system), alternative run-off and consensus building paradigms.

Winning at all costs has a deleterious effect… it debases all involved. (But, as debasing as phone jamming and domestic psy-ops may be – challenging voter eligibility and undermining the integrity of the ballot system seem more nefarious. The former being a mean spirited and perhaps racially charged invoking of the letter of the law, the latter demoralizing those who might otherwise argue that our system works despite it’s flaws.)

I’m once again brought back to Kant’s maxim: never fight (a war) in such a manner that would preclude a future peace. I try to apply this at many layers of my life… personal relationships, issue advocacy, political rhetoric. It places one in a very different mind than the war profiteers and war mongers who are vested in perpetual domination and conflict.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

There’s a confessional book out on the New Hampshire “phone jamming” effort to impact the elections back in 2002. The author was interviewed on Democracy Now (Tuesday, generic Jan 8 2008). His work in New Hampshire and New Jersey under the direction of leadership is a emblematic of the most impoverished war mentality: winning at all costs.

Witness the two examples offered: first, the “phone jamming” … the overloading of the phone system at the NH democratic campaign offices embodies a straight-forward tactic in warfare, it amounts to taking out communications of your opponent. (Do you hear an echo of Sun Tzu?)

A second example, fits the category of psychological operations … creating pre-recorded messages simulating an automated phone message campaign of the democrats, republican operatives played upon racial fears and labor force insecurity by using minority voices/accents in NJ. Ugly rumors, manipulation of media messages, cultural stereotypes in the general school of low-rhetoric has become accepted. Impersonation of the opponent’s communications, and selective targeting of their likely supporters with divisive messages is significantly more calculated and abhorent.

(Other infamous moments in electoral history reek of the war mentality and speak poorly of our national politics: watergate – irangate.)

Party leadership (of any party) should not conduct itself in a manner beneath the dignity of our republic. Playing hard and playing to win – i.e. with determination – are not the same as winning at any costs. (We can debate this, but I think that even in war, we should not seek to “win at any cost”.) If in our politics we aim for a simple majority of the votes that are counted… partisan electioneers will tend to lose interest in a whole and healthy polity in the scramble for what amounts to a cheapened “victory”.

There’s a lot of room for criticism of our political system… winner take all appears much less attractive than proportional representation (beyond the two-party system), alternative run-off and consensus building paradigms.

Winning at all costs has a deleterious effect… it debases all involved. (But, as debasing as phone jamming and domestic psy-ops may be – challenging voter eligibility and undermining the integrity of the ballot system seem more nefarious. The former being a mean spirited and perhaps racially charged invoking of the letter of the law, the latter demoralizing those who might otherwise argue that our system works despite it’s flaws.)

I’m once again brought back to Kant’s maxim: never fight (a war) in such a manner that would preclude a future peace. I try to apply this at many layers of my life… personal relationships, issue advocacy, political rhetoric. It places one in a very different mind than the war profiteers and war mongers who are vested in perpetual domination and conflict.

I’m taking a course on storytelling. Although I have been involved in community informatics for several years as an activist and organizer on digital divide/digital excellence and community networking, resuscitator I found this work to involve the telling of stories and general reframing community and what we are about, more about or what is possible for us.

I was watching a video from the TED conference where Isabel Allende offered the old adage: What is truer than truth? The story. (Variants on this answer may be a matter of translation: Legend, Myth, Story, Narrative.)

I grew up on Grimm, and many mythologies… great preparation for an early encounter with Joseph Campbell via the Power of Myth (where Bill Moyers, another hero, interviewed him). I later made extensive study of semiotics and have an enduring interest in narrative, and the importance of story and discourse.

In recent years Italo Calvino brought me back to the play of stories/storytelling in the work of the OuLiPo — where art is craft that you work at each day, and good art or literature arises from finding the right combination of signs through experiment and experienced judgment.

Campbell’s work on myth and ritual, the idea of the story opening a path to greater truth than mere facts, or perhaps a greater truth in discourse around a story than in any particular telling or offering of an account, and the idea in Calvino that folktale is not myth degenerated but that myth arises out of folktale when the right combination his hit upon, these are all connected.

Storytelling is part of the natural and necessary repertoire of human behavior… it helps us cope and adapt as well as honor and remember. Though stories can be used to divide, their healing potential is critical in this moment. Our creative play can reconfigure our individuality and our collective life.

The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard

Excellent framing of consumption.

What’s a tasty domain? The domain you want! (and sometimes the domain you had….)

Slashdot points to an important story for those following Internet/ICANN policy issues.

Domain Tasting occurs through a nice set of loopholes in Internet domain name governance. Some feel that the market will eventually sort this out, approved and others think that this much abused policy is a nice perk of the industry.

Most tasting occurs in what is known as the ‘add grace period” (agp) … a window of 5 days in which a domain can be returned to the pool of unregistered domains, more about but tasting can also occur after a domain expires.

Tasting refers to determining whether the domain has value… value has some subjective dimensions here, but two rather reductionist perspectives narrow in on whether 1) a domain is likely to attract plenty of traffic (so that even when parked it can generate profit) or 2) there are parties who will pay a premium price for control of that domain. This boils down to “what financial value can be extracted from control or resale of the domain.

A domain name being held by a Taster may be returned to the pool of unregistered names before the grace period ends at no cost… (excepting the case of .org domains, PIR.org having instituted a nominal restocking fee to dis-incent this behavior.

Tasting connects to a number of behaviors that may be detrimental to the name system and against the interest of Internet users in general.

Tasting identifies domains which can be snapped up and taken from the unregistered pool and which can be made profitable to the owner, but largely useless to everyone else (i.e. more noise and unavailable to meaningful development). If it looks like a domain is likely to generate revenue that would cover the cost of buying it, it makes perfect sense for them to hold on to it.

We have domain holders interested only in what they can monetize out of the domain … we have registrars engaged in holding domains in the add-grace and redemptive-grace period… we have perpetual holding of domains in successive registration and dropping of the same domain within add-grace provision…

Value of a domain should be more than this narrow sense of financial return.

The value of domains to the informational commons (the Internet) should also be considered.

The add-grace period may have made sense in the past. The Internet community would probably be better without it, but following the PIR lead, restocking fees may offer a partial solution. It’s a strategy favored by many as a solution to tasting.

However, if tasting is but one aspect of the behaviors in the domain ecology we shouldn’t treat it in isolation. Unfortunately the ICANN policy process favors segmenting some important issues (tasting, kiting, etc.) This divide the issues and conquer strategy benefits certain constituencies at the expense of others and at the expense of Internet users at large (all of us).

If we got rid of the add-grace period entirely… what would be the disadvantage to that? Think about it: a domain registration isn’t a large expense. The value of the time spent by an end user in the process of registering a domain, and dealing with the registrar easily outstrips the registration expense. (Just calculate the time spent by a modest hourly approximation of earning potential of the person in question.)

If we are talking about any scenario that isn’t a bulk processing of domains, the end user’s time (and the potential time of anyone he’d have to interact with assuming even the slightest possibility of a non-automated interaction) it makes no sense to have the AGP at all! If you bought it you bought it… let there be a restocking fee or return it to the pool (with no refund) if you made a mistake and don’t want to develop it. In short it doesnt save any legitimate buyer any real expense to be able to return a domain during AGP. (imagine the hurdles just in dealing directly with the registrar)

And in the case of bulk processing of domains, what basis would there be for return of domains other than your tasting didn’t return signs adequate value?

So, again, what domain is really tasty? The domain you want. Who has an inkling you might want a domain? A registrar where you checked the availability of a given domain name. They’re in a privileged position if you don’t take the domain. They’re also in a very privileged position if you fail to renew your domain in time, and they stand to make a nice profit off what was once your domain in that scenario. They may even play you off against others all the while offering to act in your interest for a premium price.

But that’s another topic. Or is it?

There’s a confessional book out on the New Hampshire “phone jamming” effort to impact the elections back in 2002. The author was interviewed on Democracy Now (Tuesday, generic Jan 8 2008). His work in New Hampshire and New Jersey under the direction of leadership is a emblematic of the most impoverished war mentality: winning at all costs.

Witness the two examples offered: first, the “phone jamming” … the overloading of the phone system at the NH democratic campaign offices embodies a straight-forward tactic in warfare, it amounts to taking out communications of your opponent. (Do you hear an echo of Sun Tzu?)

A second example, fits the category of psychological operations … creating pre-recorded messages simulating an automated phone message campaign of the democrats, republican operatives played upon racial fears and labor force insecurity by using minority voices/accents in NJ. Ugly rumors, manipulation of media messages, cultural stereotypes in the general school of low-rhetoric has become accepted. Impersonation of the opponent’s communications, and selective targeting of their likely supporters with divisive messages is significantly more calculated and abhorent.

(Other infamous moments in electoral history reek of the war mentality and speak poorly of our national politics: watergate – irangate.)

Party leadership (of any party) should not conduct itself in a manner beneath the dignity of our republic. Playing hard and playing to win – i.e. with determination – are not the same as winning at any costs. (We can debate this, but I think that even in war, we should not seek to “win at any cost”.) If in our politics we aim for a simple majority of the votes that are counted… partisan electioneers will tend to lose interest in a whole and healthy polity in the scramble for what amounts to a cheapened “victory”.

There’s a lot of room for criticism of our political system… winner take all appears much less attractive than proportional representation (beyond the two-party system), alternative run-off and consensus building paradigms.

Winning at all costs has a deleterious effect… it debases all involved. (But, as debasing as phone jamming and domestic psy-ops may be – challenging voter eligibility and undermining the integrity of the ballot system seem more nefarious. The former being a mean spirited and perhaps racially charged invoking of the letter of the law, the latter demoralizing those who might otherwise argue that our system works despite it’s flaws.)

I’m once again brought back to Kant’s maxim: never fight (a war) in such a manner that would preclude a future peace. I try to apply this at many layers of my life… personal relationships, issue advocacy, political rhetoric. It places one in a very different mind than the war profiteers and war mongers who are vested in perpetual domination and conflict.

I’m taking a course on storytelling. Although I have been involved in community informatics for several years as an activist and organizer on digital divide/digital excellence and community networking, resuscitator I found this work to involve the telling of stories and general reframing community and what we are about, more about or what is possible for us.

I was watching a video from the TED conference where Isabel Allende offered the old adage: What is truer than truth? The story. (Variants on this answer may be a matter of translation: Legend, Myth, Story, Narrative.)

I grew up on Grimm, and many mythologies… great preparation for an early encounter with Joseph Campbell via the Power of Myth (where Bill Moyers, another hero, interviewed him). I later made extensive study of semiotics and have an enduring interest in narrative, and the importance of story and discourse.

In recent years Italo Calvino brought me back to the play of stories/storytelling in the work of the OuLiPo — where art is craft that you work at each day, and good art or literature arises from finding the right combination of signs through experiment and experienced judgment.

Campbell’s work on myth and ritual, the idea of the story opening a path to greater truth than mere facts, or perhaps a greater truth in discourse around a story than in any particular telling or offering of an account, and the idea in Calvino that folktale is not myth degenerated but that myth arises out of folktale when the right combination his hit upon, these are all connected.

Storytelling is part of the natural and necessary repertoire of human behavior… it helps us cope and adapt as well as honor and remember. Though stories can be used to divide, their healing potential is critical in this moment. Our creative play can reconfigure our individuality and our collective life.

The Prisoner – a British series circa 1968 – described as Kafkaesque. I saw a few episodes in reruns on PBS (I believe) when I was a teenager. The socio-psychological political parable appealed greatly to me (as it continues to) and I’ve wanted to have the opportunity to run through the full 17 episodes some time.

The lead character, check Number 6 (played by Patrick McGoohan – who was born where I grew up!), purchase a former agent of high rank in the field of intelligence/espionage resigned his post with no explanation who has found himself prisoner in a resort town known as “the village”. The village is an orderly place where people once entrusted with secrets of state or otherwise engaged in intelligence work are kept.

I won’t give a full background of the series, physician but I think episode 4 (entitled Free for All) topical in this primary season.

This episode opens for us questions around our fears, doubts, suspicion and paranoia regarding elections and the governance system. I’ll touch lightly on a few points, and perhaps return to the topic at a later date.

Our protagonist (Number 6) perpetually contends with the Order and conformity of the Village, his attention reasonably centered upon the incumbent of Number 2, a position with high turn-over. the visible and active figure-head.

Number 2 implies a Number One. Hierarchy is important to the image of order promulgated by the Village and the powers behind it. It’s more than hierarchy… it’s the idea of a class that is out of reach (whether single or a class of many). Number One is buffered, inaccessible, never seen. Only Number Two is seen to interact with Number One.

Number 2 is “democratically elected”, or so he asserts. But the people are so much in favor of the incumbency and the order, no one stands against him in election. That is an unsatisfactory situation. We need the ritual of the election. Dare we say, we need the distraction? The myth of election and democratic process. I’m putting forward these ideas as an expression of the ideology of hierarchic power imposed in the village as made evident by Number 2

Number 6 is recruited to stand for election… and there are many aspects of the episode we could delve into: why Number 6 goes along with the charade, why he proceeds in demogogic manner, the ambivalence of the order, it’s hierarchic concentration of power and the complacency of the many.

What is real power? What is power in our society? Are we more wed to the symbolic aspects of the democratic process than to the substance? What percent voter turn-out do the “free” nations have? Do we have faith in the mechanisms we have in place: voting machines, election certification, electoral college, campaign finance? Are we concerned with a true and wide (fair) enfranchisement of the populace? (Of all peoples?) What do we think of the rights, judgment and behavior of our fellows? Will we make the changes that make sense? Will we (and the media) be attentive to what merits attention? What aspects of social control do we enforce, actively and passively, to the detriment of our interests or values?

Be seeing you.


Don’t be sold an invisible thread, get all the threads your community needs

Monday, August 20th, 2007

Nothing happening in the Midwest?

http://www.joinliveearth.org/
Nothing happening in the Midwest?

http://www.joinliveearth.org/
Nothing happening in the Midwest?

http://www.joinliveearth.org/
From: http://keep-the-core-neutral.org/

The Keep The Core Neutral Coalition is committed to protecting freedom of expression and innovation in domain name policy at ICANN.

This means basing gTLD-approval policy on criteria of only a technical/operational and related nature, prostate and refraining from embedding any particular national, regional, moral, or religious policy objectives into global ICANN policy.

http://keep-the-core-neutral.org/join

(more…)

Elements of The World We Want

Thursday, June 22nd, 2006

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, page generic then start blogging!
This is an example of a WordPress page, recuperation you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
Out for a walk on Easter, medicine I stopped in the Hyde Park 57th Street bookstore and found a copy of Amartya Sen’s new book Identity and Violence: the Illusion of Destiny.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
Out for a walk on Easter, medicine I stopped in the Hyde Park 57th Street bookstore and found a copy of Amartya Sen’s new book Identity and Violence: the Illusion of Destiny.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
Out for a walk on Easter, medicine I stopped in the Hyde Park 57th Street bookstore and found a copy of Amartya Sen’s new book Identity and Violence: the Illusion of Destiny.
We’re among friends, tooth aren’t we? We’ve been wanting a different, syringe better world, website realizing that we’d have to be different, better ourselves.
Phil Cubeta cites a lineage for three points for a transformation of philanthropy tracing back to Drucker:

  1. Fund extraordinary people, not institutions.
  2. Build on islands of health, not problems to be solved.
  3. Get big or get gone. Scale up to the size of the need, not down to the resources available.

I’ll refrain from exegesis of these three statements.

Dream of being extraordinary, and do. Don’t settle for the problems we have because of the resources we don’t have.
Karoff’s statement that the “World We Want starts with the Community We Want – so let’s talk” is a refreshing invite to the conversation we need. Let’s advance the conversation.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
Out for a walk on Easter, medicine I stopped in the Hyde Park 57th Street bookstore and found a copy of Amartya Sen’s new book Identity and Violence: the Illusion of Destiny.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
Out for a walk on Easter, medicine I stopped in the Hyde Park 57th Street bookstore and found a copy of Amartya Sen’s new book Identity and Violence: the Illusion of Destiny.
We’re among friends, tooth aren’t we? We’ve been wanting a different, syringe better world, website realizing that we’d have to be different, better ourselves.
Phil Cubeta cites a lineage for three points for a transformation of philanthropy tracing back to Drucker:

  1. Fund extraordinary people, not institutions.
  2. Build on islands of health, not problems to be solved.
  3. Get big or get gone. Scale up to the size of the need, not down to the resources available.

I’ll refrain from exegesis of these three statements.

Dream of being extraordinary, and do. Don’t settle for the problems we have because of the resources we don’t have.
Karoff’s statement that the “World We Want starts with the Community We Want – so let’s talk” is a refreshing invite to the conversation we need. Let’s advance the conversation.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view. Angela Stuber makes the point well. It’s one piece of a larger issue: communities and communinty leaders have to define the terms with regard to the digital divide.

If the Internet moves from peer basis to tiered basis, should’nt we stop calling it the Internet? Should we stop calling it that now?

I began with a dramatic title: killing the ‘Net. That phrase is meant to bring people to awareness of the gravity of the situation. I’m more inclined to say it’s already done in some respects.

Back to basics… for those who undertand the fundamental character of the Internet: it ain’t what it used to be. As more and more join the Network it resembles itself less and less, and its clue-train promise becomes more distant. It’s not the numbers that are joining, or who they are. It’s how they are being joined to the Network, and on what terms. That is, it isn’t their fault, and they are unlikely to notice what has been broken or stolen.

The rallying cry for those who see it’s been broken or stolen is that we’re going to get it back or build a new one.

The latter is often stated with an underlying sentiment that the political game is already lost because it’s rigged or corrupt or sufficiently kafkaesque that the sane would do better pursuing other means. But we haven’t given up on politics yet. And you can’t kill this Internet idea. We will build it again if it comes to that.
Out for a walk on Easter, medicine I stopped in the Hyde Park 57th Street bookstore and found a copy of Amartya Sen’s new book Identity and Violence: the Illusion of Destiny.
We’re among friends, tooth aren’t we? We’ve been wanting a different, syringe better world, website realizing that we’d have to be different, better ourselves.
Phil Cubeta cites a lineage for three points for a transformation of philanthropy tracing back to Drucker:

  1. Fund extraordinary people, not institutions.
  2. Build on islands of health, not problems to be solved.
  3. Get big or get gone. Scale up to the size of the need, not down to the resources available.

I’ll refrain from exegesis of these three statements.

Dream of being extraordinary, and do. Don’t settle for the problems we have because of the resources we don’t have.
Karoff’s statement that the “World We Want starts with the Community We Want – so let’s talk” is a refreshing invite to the conversation we need. Let’s advance the conversation.
We have a healthful the Question” href=”http://giving.typepad.com/theworldwewant/2006/06/movement_builde.html”>question before us: how can a (would-be) philanthropist (WBP) engage meaningfully with grassroots organizers in advancing the World We Want?

Let’s start with a contrast… if you want something done, stuff you can DIY, infertility or you can employ someone else. Simple enough. Except that employing others brings it’s own responsibilities.

Spending money is work, and employing others to do good things is work too. The Greeks called that higher work Leisure, and the purpose of all work, but we can go into that another time.

Organizers, and others ostensibly “doing good work” might like the WBP to just ‘gis the money. After all, we know what to do with it. (So the story goes, so we have convinced ourselves)

As quick as fools and money are parted, we aren’t looking for foolish money. We’re looking for a relationship, we’re looking for community. We want wise money, don’t we?

And that has been the problem all along: wealth exercised without enough care or cognizance of it’s ramifications, or sometimes with so much care over these things it becomes absurd in it’s ineffectiveness, inhumanity and insufficient vision.

Let’s stir men’s souls. We’re speaking from Chicago after all: the City that works, the city of broad shoulders and all that Jazz.

In between DIY and ‘leave it to the hired hands’ is a roll up your sleeves philanthropy.

Yes, we all know the symbolism and rhetoric of the boss who can get in the trenches and work along side the common man. Be we can also tell the difference between PR-fanfare and the real thing, and the symbolic effect would not be there if it didn’t speak to us of something real.

Let’s get at what is real in this. We don’t need a boss or a WBP ready for a photo-op where we use them just as much as they use us. We need to sit down and decide what work we are going to devote ourselves to and get moving. And each one of us had better bring themselves fully to the problems we face collectively.

There is great wisdom in the parable of the talents. Much is required of us. All of us.
This morning (March 21, information pills physician 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, malady I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, implant 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather SMH story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, site I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, many of the commenters cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
This morning (March 21, women’s health 2014) NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a rather smh story on ethnic diversity of authorship of scientific papers and the quality of science as (supposedly) evidenced by the weak proxy of quantity of citations. As I was shaking my head (smh) and considering a paper in response as they concluded the piece, I was rescued from that task by a promotion for the weekly favorite: “Cartalk” where one of the click and clack brothers serendipitously offered the perfect rhetorical refutation of the preceding segment. I quote: “Do two people who don’t know what they are talking about know more or less than one person who doesn’t know what he is talking about?” In any case, commenters at the embedded link cover basic challenges to the segment and it’s premise.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
What’s wry about these things, troche my writings? Don’t wrythe or groan. Write back.


wrythings is written by Michael Maranda
Facebook me!

bear with me, anabolics much of my writing here is going to be of this form… semi-stream semi-conscious … sometimes I’ll explain how I got where I was going or why I started off in some direction. but I digress!

Earlier today a Peter Greenaway short film crossed my mind. I’ve wanted to play the film to the cybertel policy & community networking crowd for some time: Dear Phone (1977), visit web thought it would be great to get it for an event. We’ll see.

Tonight TCM was playing Western Union… I only caught the second half. Western Union doesn’t do telegrams anymore and American Telephone and Telegraph is back on top as Ma Bell is re-merging. I was thinking about the history of telecom and the presentation of network-empire building on the silver screen. Maybe they’d enjoy the Greenaway short at AFI Silver Theater for the F2C happening the first few days of April? We’ll leave that to Mr. Isenberg to work out.
More than 15 years ago I heard a radio broadcast with the above title… I have been keeping my eye out for it for some time, visit for the chance to listen again. All I had was a title, visit web or what I remembered as the key phrase, pilule which did turn out to be the title. Some time back a good friend tracked it down for me with his mad-library-science-skilz. The artist was Sheila Davies.
Although I had the information I sought, I had other financial priorities at that point, and didnt make the purchase. Now, as I’ve been delving into the obscure and interesting artifacts of my memory and decided to look it up… and it’s out of stock. Have any of you heard the work?

Sometimes it is important to trace lineage… or to search in one’s self and ask how you got where you are, and what influenced you. I was influenced early on by exposure to the history of radio broadcasts largely through the deep knowledge of a family friend, Rick Hall, who worked in Radio. He had quite the collection of vintage broadcasts and I feel so fortunate to have listened to such classics as The Shadow and a plethora of others programs, I won’t even attempt to recall.

In the realm of sports and media, there is the oft-repeated theme of the magic of the radio broadcast… the experience of the nation. We all can’t be there in person. The radio opens the minds eye when the broadcasting voice is creatively gifted. And as our mind’s eye is opened it weaves tapestries and this weaving is what matters.

I think it was a gift to be exposd to Radio in this way. Even if it was much after the original broadcasts. To listen in the dark of night to these stories. They set a fairly high bar for the art of the story. One I always aspired to, but one I recognize as quite the challenge. It established a taste for this art… and later in discovering the work of Ken Nordine and other such radio artists later in college, was really opened wide. Written and Spoken word with layers of sound and narrative. This mindscape was a source of comfort and curiousity through many a night. Finding the right radio station willing to offer history and the avant-garde was always on my mind when traveling to new cities.

With the Internet and the growth of Indy Media I expect that we have so much opportunity for experience and experiments once more. Take a moment… a dark moment, shut yourself off from the multiple channels of connectivity and stimulation. Your eyes may be open or closed in this darkness, but open your ear.

For possibly good reason one of my favorite films… Palombella Rosa was on my mind as I drove back from Batavia, thumb IL .Several years ago the Gene Siskel Film Center presented a number of films by Italian director Nanni Moretti… with this one in particular standing out. There are several exceptional moments in the film… where popular culture unites competing factions and teams, medications not to mention halting in-fighting.The film offers sport – water polo – as political metaphor.I’m still hoping to get a copy of this on DVD.. each time I look its not been available. Dont even know that it has been released to DVD.So, online what brought this to mind? There was a general context of civic action and organizing for the day.

I was in Batavia to meet with others concerned about the political process in Illinois… considering everything from http://www.ballot-integrity.org to campaign finance.

ilCTC and NPOTechs had something to say on civic use of technology, but our deeper concern rests upon recognition of the alienation of so many from the political process. There is much to be repaired to overcome the malaise of the electorate. The act of gathering to repair has restorative function in itself.

Among the more interesting issues to come up was the backstory on HAVA… federal legislation that signals a shift in power from the states over voting procedures and which is pushing many states towards an incautious certification of propietary electronic voting systems.

I encourage you to dig for the backstory of HAVA… who introduced the legislation (now law)? Who helped draft it?

A more talented political voice than I could easily develop the theme:

Who wrote HAVA and how it hurts us all

It seemed very odd to me that the electronic voting devices with clear and obvious problems – not to mention problems surrounding security and sanctity of process – have been taken as a done deal by some of the active voices in the state on these topics.

Accepting that HAVA brings deadlines to the states for implementation of these new requirements is wrong headed. We should be fighting HAVA if the GAO has issued critical reports on electronic voting machines.

Meanwhile in Illinois we’ve approved machines that Governors of about seven other states have decertified. It would be nice if those Governors sent a friendly note to the Illinois Governor informing him of how they reached their decision, and encouraging him to have the State Board of Elections revisit the issue… or possibly disbanding the SBoE in its current form as they have not heeded public reason.

In fact, as I understand their recent meeting where the equipment was approved may have violated rules requiring open public meetings.

It’s time to do something if we want people to have faith in political process…. that is…. it’s time for us all to do something.

There was a great sports metaphor offered today in Batavia by a gentleman from the Quick’n Clean Foundation… He described the political process through the metaphor of a baseball diamond… the four corners representing key themes drawn out in discussion.

He then built out this metaphor … driving home the point … in addiition to the diamond we have the grandstand where we’re all spectators. Yes, politics as spectator sport… but he urged us to take the field and to cover the bases… his four points of the diamond….

Hmmmm.. What was the name of that film again?
As, discount always, there’s a lineage here… the giving conference of two years ago, of which I’ve been regaled with accounts… and last year, the first ONet member initiated open space conference in Oak Park… well, we’re doing it again this coming July. There’s some cutting edge stuff going on… imagine any number of folk pushing a multiplicity of edges and searching for a language with which to share and build on that pluralized extension of the envelope. We’re still thinking through some issues, and we don’t know what will happen, but just for a moment think on the questions put before the Open Space mailing lists: questions of co-location and co-convening of events. Imagine networks overlaid upon each other. Imagine multiple networks compacted into the same space… if they are as viscous as our instinct tells us… the strength of transforming ties will be the word coming out of this.

Find your way in through moreandmore.us.

I took a moment to visit Boing Boing on this quiet Sunday afternoon… and the Blank Noise Project was the top article. The Blank Noise Project is a blogging project featuring Indian women on the subject of sexual harrassment and abuse known as “eve teasing”.There are many many bloggers contributing to this, malady and I think the effort deserves wide attention. I read a few of the blogs, seek and this one stood out for me because it referenced the Indian penal code and it is so sad to see good laws on the books going unenforced, what is ed or to hear of cases where the defenders of the peace discourage filing of complaints and it seems an act of stoicism to file a compaint against such pressures.

Spread the word.

While thinking about a panel on Digital Excellence and Community Internet that Sascha asked me to put together for the 2007 there Maryland” target=”_blank”>International Summit for Community Wireless Networks I was reviewing some notes I intended to blog from the previous one, held in St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, and decided the story I had heard warranted a retelling.

I’ll neglect the niceties of transition and jump right to my notes:

Media tools have expanded in tremendous variety as a result of computing and the Internet. Collaborative and advanced communication tools are often not the first tools brought to communities when digital divisions are being addressed, but they are the most empowering because they are the tools of using one’s voice.

Let’s for a moment take “voice” literally, as opposed to metaphorically (as creative/expressive outlet)… to consider a wonderful example where quite the opposite occurred.

I’d heard part of the story before, as I am friends with communications technology activists who were directly involved in the efforts to bring community communications infrastructure and tools to the hurricane devastated gulf.

Harold Feld, of the Media Access Project, a DC group directly engaged in media policy advocacy at the national level recounted the story as a story of political heroism and to some degree one of civil disobedience.

I was caught up in the poetry of Feld’s closing address to our group, on the themes of Passion and Politics and the recovery of the positive in these themes and in their connection to each other, so forgive me for glossing things over and only offering a limited piece of what he was saying, and also if I blend the next series of points which really is an agglomeration of the sentiments expressed by several.

The main thing for me as regard to this conversation is that many people think of wireless in terms of computing and laptops… making life and work perhaps more flexible and comfortable for white-collar workers…. the image being people accessing their laptops for whatever purpose in a cafe.

Leaders in the wireless movement took it upon themselves to actively engage with the FCC and more directly in the effort to help others in the aftermath of Katrina. They got in their cars and went down to a staging area on someone’s farm and proceeded to deploy community developed wireless communications backbone equipment… not so people could use laptops at cafes but so people could use Voice over Internet services to contact friends and family – to reconnect – to let others know how they were.

Another person recounted the story of one of these wireless activists who needed to climb a tower, and a local sheriff whose entire communications capability was reduced to a 2-way radio… and the sheriff asked simply what the activist was going to do for him and his community… essentially, are you going to do something good for us?

Politics was set aside for a political act. The sheriff, understanding that this person was bringing telephony to an area where the communications infrastructure was wiped out was there to do something good. He said, of the tower and door, which they really didn’t have any permission to legally access… if it is locked, “I’ll shoot the lock off myself.”

Together they acted, in a political act… one not too dissimilar from civil disobedience…

These sorts of stories need to be told and retold. There are community level solutions to many problems, and some involve technologies that while advanced, are not terribly difficult to understand or deploy, and which have robust features and characteristics. The communities’ ability to respond in crisis is something that requires greater distribution of digital and technical literacy, but more than that it requires an understanding that we can act to our common benefit on many more areas of our life than we otherwise generally feel.

Moving on to one last example… a gentleman from India spoke eloquently on the importance of technology for communications among those with disabilities… thinking even of tools that voice enable applications or allow for alternate means of processing text, that this has benefits likewise for low-literacy persons… imagining that we have local community intranets replete with data of use to people…

These are all examples of community resources and potential resources that can be deployed and invested in on a local basis… and yet we are so little aware of these possibilities. These are media resources with social purpose: overcoming isolation and empowering people.

I’ve been writing on defining digital divides for ourselves in our own communities as opposed to thinking about them in terms of the series of solutions that have come to many communities in a top-down manner, treat even if partly the result of demands from the bottom or near-bottom (or those at least cognizant of a divide) for something.

I generally recite the typical aspects of the divide: equipment, training, and connectivity and deconstruct/explode them further along lines anyone can understand: technology changes more and more rapidly. So: is a given piece of equipment up to it’s task, is it equitable? is a given training regimen adequate? are there other tools and strategies we should be trying? is the connectivity on par with what others have, and at similar price point?

That’s all well for an effort to break free from other’s definitions of the divide, especially from those who would have us believe it has been bridged.

Back to the beginning: what I take to be one of the hallmarks of the divide is isolation.

I began by writing that the digital divide is not over…. I feel a compulsion to reiterate that point… and to bluntly state that perhaps those who would have us believe it is over have simply not heard, or not heard from those who are most isolated… those who are effectively voiceless because their stories don’t get told in a meaningful way and they are often without the tools to tell their own stories in the media of the connected.

In my own city there are plenty of people who do not realize the isolation of individuals and communities so proximate to them geographically.

We must advance community use of media tools, and community and individual participation with media tools to tell their own stories… to be the media (as the saying goes).
It’s probably better spell the whole thing out. Let’s think seriously about the Internet. If it’s just the ‘Net we run the risk of taking it for granted, cialis sale as many of us do. What is the Internet, then? Do we have quite the same Internet as we did before Brand X? What will we have after the Telecom Rewrite? The stage is set for Whitacre Tiering. Another dimension of the digital divide comes into view.