CMC II: Connecting the Dots (Nov 14)

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The Google-Verizon recognition of the Open Internet opened the door to fundamental policy clarity at the FCC.

Defenders of the Open Internet, remedy pilule
Network Neutrality and even Common Carriage can stand firm together in support of a principle of Network Clarity: the Open Internet is not a Service. It is a general purpose open communications framework independent of the various technologies and infrastructure that compose it. As a communications framework and must remain open as speech must remain free.

The regime of service-oriented policy now ends.

test
The Google-Verizon recognition of the Open Internet opened the door to fundamental policy clarity at the FCC.

Defenders of the Open Internet, remedy pilule
Network Neutrality and even Common Carriage can stand firm together in support of a principle of Network Clarity: the Open Internet is not a Service. It is a general purpose open communications framework independent of the various technologies and infrastructure that compose it. As a communications framework and must remain open as speech must remain free.

The regime of service-oriented policy now ends.

Seth Johnson has heroically led the charge for a policy of Network Clarity at the FCC, this pulling together a number of Internet Luminaries (and myself) to sign on to the Joint Reply Comments of Various Advocates for the Open Internet. Read the document. Spread the word, and shed some light on the distinction between the Open Internet and Specialized Services.

The Google-Verizon recognition of the Open Internet opened the door to fundamental policy clarity at the FCC.

Defenders of the Open Internet, Network Neutrality and even Common Carriage can stand firm together in support of a principle of Network Clarity: the Open Internet is not a Service. It is a general purpose open communications framework independent of the various technologies and infrastructure that compose it. As a communications framework and must remain open as speech must remain free.

The regime of service-oriented policy now ends.

For a more nuanced exegesis of the significance of the policy ramifications, see Dr. David Reed’s post.

test
The Google-Verizon recognition of the Open Internet opened the door to fundamental policy clarity at the FCC.

Defenders of the Open Internet, remedy pilule
Network Neutrality and even Common Carriage can stand firm together in support of a principle of Network Clarity: the Open Internet is not a Service. It is a general purpose open communications framework independent of the various technologies and infrastructure that compose it. As a communications framework and must remain open as speech must remain free.

The regime of service-oriented policy now ends.

Seth Johnson has heroically led the charge for a policy of Network Clarity at the FCC, this pulling together a number of Internet Luminaries (and myself) to sign on to the Joint Reply Comments of Various Advocates for the Open Internet. Read the document. Spread the word, and shed some light on the distinction between the Open Internet and Specialized Services.

The Google-Verizon recognition of the Open Internet opened the door to fundamental policy clarity at the FCC.

Defenders of the Open Internet, Network Neutrality and even Common Carriage can stand firm together in support of a principle of Network Clarity: the Open Internet is not a Service. It is a general purpose open communications framework independent of the various technologies and infrastructure that compose it. As a communications framework and must remain open as speech must remain free.

The regime of service-oriented policy now ends.

For a more nuanced exegesis of the significance of the policy ramifications, see Dr. David Reed’s post.

Coalition Movement Camp II: Connecting the Dots
November 14, order 2010, 2.00pm to 6pm EST: http://movementcamp.org

The Coalition Movement Camp series brings new players and possibilities into view and allows us to connect the dots between them. Our goal is to consolidate our collective powers and prepare for a collaborative web development project unlike anything the world has seen.

The inaugural Coalition Movement Camp took place on October 10, 2010. Participants included representatives of Appropedia, OpenKollab, Metacurrency, 350, Dadamac, CoopAgora, JAK Bank, GreenTribe, and Gaia10. For eight hours, we brainstormed ideas towards a new generation of internet platforms and collaborative strategies for the climate crisis. Details of the 10/10/10 Coalition Movement Camp can be found on the Coalition blog (http://cotw.me/invite101010, http://cotw.me/camp101010).

On November 14, 2010, the conversation continues.

Why are we doing this?

• The world is warming. Satellite records show that in the past two decades, the process of warming has sped up. 2010 is on track to be the warmest year on record.
• Without drastic action, we risk temperature rises of 6°C or more by the end of this century. This would be a catastrophe.
• Yet the current international community is ill-prepared, if not unwilling, to reign in carbon emissions to prevent this outcome.

We have no choice but to try a new approach.

We propose using new internet tools and a renewed commitment to interoperability and collaboration to creatively impact this situation and turn it around.

The internet is rapidly evolving from a place for sharing information to a place for collaboration and co-creation. How easy it should be, given the money, talent, and need in the world, to build an online network that enables the best people from about the world to collaborate on climate action solutions.

This is our vision. It is neither radical nor extreme. It is necessary, plain and simple.

Join us on November 14, 2010, as we continue this world-changing adventure. The venue is an open collaboration staging area: http://movementcamp.org. There will be sessions devoted to BetterMeans/Open Enterprise Manifesto, the Global Innovation Commons, and more. You’ll be able to upload image and video files and contribute to real time chat. There will be live interviews and webcasts, with an audio stream component for participants in low-bandwidth zones. Our facilitators will work to summarize developments and keep you up to speed.

Coalition Movement Camp II: Connecting the Dots will run from 2.00pm to 6pm EST. International start times: 7.00pm London, 11.00am Los Angeles, 2.00pm NYC, 6.00am Sydney (Nov 15). Enlist here: http://cotw.me/enlist (Local Start Times: http://cotw.me/cmc2starttime)

If you’d like to send a video shout out or presentation to Coalition Movement Camp participants, we welcome pre-recorded content. Please submit links to Vimeo or Youtube content by Friday November 12, 5.00pm Los Angeles time, and we’ll include suitable material on the Coalition Movement Camp blog. Submit these to: tropology at gmail dot com. Submitted content should include a summary paragraph, with links to more information.

If you are ready to roll up your sleeves and join in this work, see the Coalition Portal for an orientation: http://cotw.cc/

Coalition Movement Camp II: Connecting the Dots

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